Welcome to the Green Lake County Health Unit!

THE GREEN LAKE COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH DEPT. CAN BE REACHED OR PAGED AFTER HOURS FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS BY CALLING THE SHERIFF'S DEPT. DISPATCH AT 920-294-4000.

Staff Directory
Kathy Munsey, RN Health Officer
Tracy Soda Public Health Nurse II
Judy Kasuboski Public Health Nurse II
Jeri Loewe Public Health Nurse II
Renee Peters††† Birth to 3 Services Coordinator
Marilyn Voeltner Community Health Educator - Tobacco Program
Ben Weiler Environmental Health Specialist
Jackie Westover Wisconsin Well Woman Program Coordinator
Birth to 3
Are you the parent of a child under 3? Every family wants the best possible start for their child.

Even though all children are different, there are certain milestones that children are expected to achieve such as rolling, crawling, sitting, walking, talking, and understanding what is said to them (to name a few).

The Birth to 3 Program is a service to assist families in supporting their child's development. If you have concerns about the way your child is developing, don't wait! Call (920)294-4070.

Parents, family members, and professionals work as members of the Early Intervention Team to promote a child's development.


Who may be eligible for Birth to 3 Services?

Children experiencing difficulties with thinking or learning skills, movement skills, talking and understanding skills, feeding, daily living skills, interactions, and play skills.

Children with a diagnosed medical, physical, or mental condition that may affect their development; for example- Down Syndrome, Cerebral Palsy, Chronic illness, vision or hearing impairments, etc.


The Birth to 3 Program will work with you to:
  • Evaluate your child's development
  • Develop a plan for services based on your family and child's strengths, concerns, and needs
  • Provide information about additional community resources and link you to them
  • Offer advocacy and support

How does Birth to 3 Services fit in with other community services?

The Birth to 3 home-based program is one piece of a network of family support services offered in your community. Families may be involved in one or many services depending on individual child and family needs. The Birth to 3 Program will work together with other service providers to ensure the most effective use of resources for your family.


What is your child doing?
Developmental Checklist
3 Months Holds head up
Grasps objects
Babbles, coos
Turns toward sounds
6 Months Rolls from back to stomach
Reaches for toys
Sits with support
Mouths objects
9 Months Crawls
Grasps with thumb and forefinger
Imitates sounds
Hold, bites, and chews cracker
12 Months Stands alone, takes steps
Builds tower of 2 blocks
Follows simple instructions
Finger feeds self
15-18 Months Walks alone, seldom falls
Scribbles
Names objects
Begins to use spoons
24 Months Combines words
Jumps in place
Turns page of book
Points to 4 body parts
Initiates play activities
36 Months Walks up and down stairs
Copies a circle
Points to small details in a picture
Guiding Principles
  • Parents know their child best and are important members of the Early Intervention Team
  • Parent-child interactions are the building blocks of a child's development
  • Children's development is best supported through interactions with familiar people in play and daily routines

Birth to 3 Providers work with families to plan and implement the most appropriate program for the child.
See the Birth to Three Reports as follows:
Birth to Three Federal Indicators 2011-2012
Determination Letter Birth - Three Federal Indicators
Birth to Three 2012 FFY Compliance Letter


 

For more information, to make a referral, or to request a free screening, please call:

Green Lake County
Birth to 3 Program
Renee Peters
rpeters@co.green-lake.wi.us
500 Lake Steel Street, PO Box 588
Green Lake, WI 54941
Telephone: (920)294-4070
Fax: (920)294-4139

Early Intervention...
Because the first 3 years build a lifetime

Additional resources
State website - http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/children/birthto3/index.htm
Children and Youth with Special HealthCare Needs  

What is High Blood Pressure?
Nearly one in every four American adults has high blood pressure. Some people think having high blood pressure means that you're nervous or that you work too hard. That's not true. High blood pressure really is a warning that your heart is working harder than normal to pump blood and extra fluid through your body. When high blood pressure is not treated, it can lead to serious damage to blood vessels that feed the heart, the brain, and the kidneys. Uncontrolled high blood pressure is the major cause of heart attacks, strokes, and kidney disease.

Your doctor records two numbers when he measures your blood pressure. The first number (systolic pressure) measures the pressure generated while your heart is beating. The second number (diastolic pressure) measures the pressure while your heart is resting between beats. Normal blood pressure falls within a range; it's not one set of numbers. But it should be less than 140/90 if you're an adult. If your blood pressure goes above this threshold and stays there, you have high blood pressure.

Your blood pressure can change from minute to minute, with changes in:
*posture
*exercise
*degree of tension
*smoking
*sleeping

Your doctor may take several readings over a period before making a judgment about high blood pressure. High blood pressure is not "nervous tension." People who have high blood pressure aren't always overanxious, compulsive or "nervous." In fact, you can have high blood pressure and not know it. High blood pressure, in the early stages, may have few, if any, symptoms. That's why it's called the "Silent Killer."

High blood pressure affects people of all ages. It's more common among people over 40-years-old. High blood pressure may run in families, but many people with a strong family history of high blood pressure never have it.

Childhood Lead Poison Prevention

Protecting children from exposure to lead is important to lifelong good health.  Even low levels of lead in blood have been shown to affect IQ, ability to pay attention, and academic achievement.  Effects of lead exposure cannot be corrected.  Preventing lead exposure before it occurs is the most important step parents, doctors, and others can take.  To learn more about childhood lead poisoning prevention reference the following:


CDC  @ http://www.cdc.gov/lead/

                http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/


WI CLPPP (Wisconsin Childhood Lead Poison Prevention Program) @ http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/lead/


EPA @ http://www2.epa.gov/lead


HUD @ http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/program_offices/healthy_homes/healthyhomes/lead

 

Below are links with additional information regarding Blood Lead Levels:

Blood Lead Levels!  What Do They Mean?
Blood Lead Levels in Children!  How to Protect Your Children!

Cholesterol level that is too high may lead to hardening of the arteries, heart disease and a heart attack. But, you can lower your cholesterol by getting more physical activity, following a healthy eating plan and not smoking.

Cholesterol, a white, waxy fat found naturally in your body, is used to build cell walls and make certain hormones. Too much of it, though, can clog your arteries and eventually choke off the supply of blood to the heart, which is the reason high cholesterol is a leading risk factor for heart disease.

A cholesterol level below 200 is considered desirable, between 200 and 239 is considered borderline-high, and 240 or more is considered high. Cholesterol levels tend to increase as you grow older. How much you engage in physical activity, what you eat, and whether or not you smoke affect your cholesterol levels. High cholesterol can run in families. Also, some people have rare disorders that cause very high levels.

To lower your cholesterol, the Health Unit suggests the following:
* Eat a wide variety of foods low in saturated fat and cholesterol;
* Eat at least five servings of vegetables and fruits every day;
* Eat six or more servings of whole-grain products, such as pasta and cereals;
* Strive to get 30 minutes of physical activity on most or all days of the week;
* Maintain a healthy weight, and
* If you smoke, try to quit. Smoking is the biggest risk factor for heart disease.

Reporting Communicable Diseases

Wisconsin Statutes requires physicians and child caregivers to report communicable diseases to your local health department. This early reporting will provide the necessary information needed to contact the family and begin an investigation to help control further spread of the disease. Below is a link to Chapter HFS 145, which lists the diseases which are currently reportable.
www.dhfs.state.wi.us/communicable/diseasereporting/index.htm

What to Do to Report Diseases
For diseases in Categories I, II and III, follow the procedure below:

  1. Call your local public health department.
  2. Identify connection with case, i.e. health provider, daycare worker
  3. Report illness (also include anyone who has contact with the ill person).
  4. Give the following information for each case (Categories I and II only):
    • Name of the ill person
    • Physician of ill person, if known
    • Diagnosed or suspected disease
    • Address and telephone of ill person
    • Age or date of birth of ill person
    • Race and ethnicity of ill person
    • County of residence of ill person
    • Date of onset of illness, if known
    • Name of parent or guardian, if a minor
    • Immunization history, if the disease is a vaccine-preventable disease

Phone and address for local public health agencies are listed in the governmental agency section of your phone book under “health” or “public health.”

For fact sheets on these diseases, go to http://www.cdc.gov/health/default.htm

The Green Lake County Health Unit has developed a Community Health Improvement Plan (CHIP).
Attached†is the most current plan.

For more information contact the Green Lake County Health Unit at (920)294-4070.

Environmental Health Services are provided by the Tri-County Environmental Health Consortium. The Consortium consists of Green Lake, Marquette and Waushara counties. Waushara County is the lead agency for this program.

For more information about services available through the consortium, visit www.wausharacountypublichealth.com/Food-Program
Families are eligible for services if they have a child with a severe disability, under the age of 21, and living at home. A severe disability is a physical, mental or emotional limitation which seriously restricts the child's ability to carry out basic daily living skills such as self-care, learning, communications, mobility, and self-direction. Although family living income is not a basis for eligibility, cost-sharing may be required on a sliding fee scale. Family Support is a state-funded program. Because each county has limited funding for the program, eligibility does not guarantee a famiy will receive services. Agencies may have waiting lists for services and assessments. Administering agencies may make the final decision on who is served and approve each family's service plan. The contact person at the county is Renee Peters, Birth - Three Coordinator - (920)294-4070. State #1(800)642-7837

FLOOD SAFETY AND SANITATION RECOMMENDATIONS

When flooding of an area has occurred, either due to heavy rains or sewer backups, important steps must be taken to assure the health and safety of individuals involved. It should be assumed, during cleanup operations, that all surfaces have been contaminated with disease-causing organisms. This important assumption must be considered in decisions involving personal the safety of cleanup personnel as well as what items may be salvaged and what should be discarded.

PERSONAL PROTECTION MEASURES

  • Only individuals necessary for cleanup should be in affected areas. Persons with respiratory health problems (e.g., asthma, emphysema) should NOT perform the clean up. Children and pets should not be allowed in these areas.
  • Boots and rubber gloves should be worn at all times. In cases where rigorous splashing of contaminated water may occur, a dust mask and eye protection should also be worn.
  • When using a bleach solution, open windows to provide good ventilation.
  • At no time should cuts or open sores be left exposed.
  • Do not smoke, eat or drink during clean up.
  • A tetanus booster is recommended if it has been more than 5 years since you received your last Td.

GENERAL SAFETY PRECAUTIONS

  • Be absolutely certain that there is no hazard of electrical shock! Wear rubber boots in wet areas until it is certain no electrical hazard exists.
  • Turn off main switches and unplug electrical appliances in wet areas.
  • Do not turn on any appliances that have become wet until they have been thoroughly dried and checked for proper operation.
  • Do not use matches or any other open flame until the area has been thoroughly ventilated from natural gas. The gas supply to all appliances in flooded areas should be shut off until the appliance has been checked.

CLEAN UP PROCEDURES

  • Bacteria, viruses, mold, fungi, etc., must be killed in the clean up process. The most widely accepted, safe, and effective sanitizing agent is hypochlorite in the form of household bleach. For all of the following procedures, the bleach solution referred to is one half cup (4 ounce) of bleach to one gallon of water. This will give a sufficient strength to kill organisms.
  • Time is an important consideration in clean up. Organisms to be killed will not become airborne as long as they remain wet. As long as surfaces remain wet, the only way organisms can enter the body and cause disease is by splashing into the mouth, eyes, open cuts, etc. Once dried, organisms can be spread on dust particles by air movement. It is, therefore, important to bring the bleach solution in contact with contaminated surfaces as soon as possible after rinsing off heavy soil. In order to prevent decomposition and rotting of wet items, immediate drying after disinfection is necessary.
  • Once the water has receded, the following steps should be taken:
    • Assure that the above personal protection and general safety steps have been taken.
    • Determine what items will have to be discarded and remove them for disposal.
    • Generally, if the bleach solution can be made to come in contact with all surfaces, an item may be salvageable. Stuffed furniture, pillows, and mattresses will have to be discarded. Indoor/outdoor carpeting and rugs may be salvageable. Thick wall to wall carpets and padding will have to be discarded or professionally treated.
    • Thoroughly rinse all visible soil from items to be salvaged. Rinse the walls from several inches above the highest level the water reached to the floor. Carefully hose behind any base coving to remove all soil. Hose down the entire floor.
    • Prepare the bleach solution of ½ cup (4 oz.) of household bleach to one gallon of water. Smaller items may be immersed in this solution. Hand scrub larger items with the solution. Pour this solution on the walls several inches up from the highest level reached by the floodwaters and over the entire floor. Make sure all affected surfaces have been contacted with the solution. An effective method is to use a broom or mop to splash the solution on the walls and over all of the floors.
    • If water has reached more than a few inches up the walls, hollow walls will have to be opened. Cut off the portion of the drywall that has become wet. Saturate the remaining studs with bleach solution.
    • Using various methods, dry all surfaces as much as possible (the bleach solution needs 15 minutes to kill organisms.) The wettest areas can be squeegeed or mopped to a floor drain. A wet/dry vacuum can be used on flat surfaces to further remove remaining water. Using fans and/or a dehumidifier thoroughly ventilate the rooms to dry all surfaces.
    • Indoor/outdoor carpeting and rugs need a very thorough treatment if they are to be safely salvaged. Remove them to a flat area such as a driveway. Hose down both sides of the carpet several times to thoroughly remove all soil. Follow this with several buckets of the bleach solution on each side, scrubbing with a broom. Then rinse both sides with clear water. Remove as much water as possible with a wet/dry vacuum and allow to thoroughly dry.
    • Over the next weeks, replace disposable furnace filters or clean permanent filters with the bleach solution at least two times to reduce trapped mold spores.

Wounds:

If you are wounded or punctured, while conducting cleanup operations, contact your physician.

Future Concerns:

A major health concern after flooding or other water damage in homes is the growth of molds, bacteria, and other biological contaminants. This is often associated with a musty mildew odor, as well as visible evidence of mold growth on walls, floors, carpeting, or other water damaged items. Some persons may be allergic to or develop allergies or asthma-like symptoms from exposure to these contaminants. It is important that items in a home contributing to mold and bacteria growth be cleaned and dried as soon as possible. See item(s) below. If this is not possible the item(s) should be discarded. The following are provided as general recommendations for dealing with water damage.

CORRECTING WATER DAMAGE

  • Discard any water-damaged furnishings such as carpet, drapes, stuffed toys, upholstered furniture, mattresses, wicker furniture, ceiling tiles, and other porous items unless they can be cleaned by steam cleaning or hot water washing and thorough drying.
  • Remove and replace wet insulation to prevent conditions where biological pollutants can grow.
  • Wash surfaces and floors with a household chlorine bleach solution. A ½ cup of household bleach per gallon of water is recommended. The bleach solution should stay in contact with affected surfaces at least fifteen minutes before rinsing off with clean water.
  • Seal all leaks (ceiling, walls, and foundations) and correct improper surface drainage. Reduce moisture generation in crawl spaces by ventilation or covering the crawl space floor with a moisture resistant material such as polyethylene.

HOME INSPECTION AFTER WATER DAMAGE

  • Inspect and clean all appliances that have been in contact with water.
  • Have professionals check heating/cooling ducts and wall insulation for mold growth.
  • Look for obvious mold growth throughout the house including attics, basements, crawlspaces, and around the foundation.

WHEN STORMS CAUSE A POWER OUTAGE, BE SURE YOUR FOOD IS SAFE!

  • If energy shortages or severe weather shut off your electricity try to keep a cool head—but don't peek in your refrigerator, say food safety specialists at the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection.
  • Prevent food spoilage by keeping the freezer or refrigerator closed. Foods can stay cold and safe for two days in a fully packed and closed freezer and safe for one day in a half-full freezer.
  • Don't open the freezer until power is restored. If food items have ice crystals throughout and feel cold to the touch, they can be re-frozen.
  • But if in doubt, throw it out. Illness-causing food bacteria can grow quickly and can't always be detected by smell or taste.
  • The same guidelines go for the refrigerator. However, refrigerators will not be able to maintain safe temperatures during a power outage for much more than six hours. When the power comes back on, take a temperature reading of some of the foods. If the reading is above 40 degrees (F.), discard all perishable foods such as: raw or cooked meat or seafood; milk and dairy products; cooked pasta and pasta salads; fresh eggs and egg substitutes; meat-topped pizza and lunch meats; casseroles and soups; mayonnaise and tartar sauce; and cream filled pastries.
  • Other items such as butter, ketchup, jelly, hard cheeses, and bread and rolls are usually safe if power is restored within two days. Discard all foods that may have been contaminated by floodwaters or by raw meat juices.

Additional flooding information can be obtained at: http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/flood/index.htm

The Health Department staff can be reached at 920-294-4070.

The Health Unit is committed to preventing disease and promoting health for all citizens in Green Lake County. The unit offers a wide range of public health services focused on the control and containment of human public health hazards.

The core functions of public health are to assess and monitor the health status of the entire county, develop public health policy, and assure access to quality health care.

Assessment:

  • Monitoring health status for community health problems
  • Investigating and controlling health problems and environmental hazards

Policy Development:

  • Educating the public
  • Promoting community partnerships
  • Creating policies and plans that support health

Assurance:

  • Linking people with needed health services
  • Promoting a sufficient workforce
  • Evaluating health services
  • Conducting research
  • Promoting access to health care
  • Enforcing laws and regulations that protect health and ensure safety
  • Promoting social and economic conditions that support good health

If further information is desired, please contact the Health Unit at 920-294-4070, or 800-664-3588.

Routine health care should include immunizations whether they come from your personal health care provider or from your local health department. The full range of required childhood immunizations as well as adult tetanus is provided at no charge at monthly clinics. TB Skin testing, Adult Hepatitis B series and Adult Flu vaccine are available for a fee.

Please call Green Lake County Health Department at 920-294-4070 or 800-664-3588 to schedule an appointment. Parents must accompany kids under age 18. No walk-ins please.

 

GREEN LAKE COUNTY IMMUNIZATION CLINICS FOR 2014 

January       7          1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
                   15        1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
February     4          1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
                   19        1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
March          4          1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
                   19        1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
April                1          1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
                    16        1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
May             6          1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
                   21        1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
June             3          1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
                    18        1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
July              1          1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
                     16        1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
August         5          1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
                     20        1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
September   2          1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
                     17        1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
October         7          1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
                     15        1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
November      4          1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
                     19        1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
December      2          1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake
                     17        1:00-4:00 p.m., Green Lake

______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Clinic Locations:     GREEN LAKE – Human Services Center, 571 County Road A (1st Tuesday & 3rd Wednesday)

**Clinic dates are adjusted if they fall on legal or government holidays.

APPOINTMENTS ARE REQUIRED! CALL 920-294-4070 OR 1-800-664-3588

 

NEW FEDERAL REQUIREMENTS ONLY ALLOW US TO SERVE CHILDREN on mEDICAL ASSISTANCE, Badgercare or those who are un-insured. those who have insurance should contact their physician to obtain their childhood vaccinations.   WE WILL CONTINUE TO PROVIDE FLU SHOTS FOR ADULTS AS IN THE PAST.


Please note: The Varicella vaccine (chicken pox) is ONLY available in the Green Lake Office.

Printable Schedule

2014 Immunication Schedule

Lyme disease is in one of five tickborne diseases identified in Wisconsin that occur following the bites of blacklegged ticks (deer ticks). Lyme disease may cause signs and symptoms affecting the skin, nervous system, heart, or joints of an infected person. Lyme disease symptoms may appear from 3 days to 30 days after a bite of an infected tick. The illness often, but not always, begins as a roughly circular reddish rash (called erythema migrans or EM rash) around or near the site of the tick bite. The rash is different from an allergic reaction to an insect bite in that it expands in size over a period of days or weeks, and may have a bull's eye appearance. During the EM rash stage, other symptoms such as fever, headache, fatigue, stiff neck, muscle or joint pain and swelling may be present and may last for several weeks. If left untreated, complications such as meningitis, facial palsy, heart abnormalities, and arthritis may occur within a few weeks to months after the initial onset of symptoms. Lyme disease is treated very effectively with oral antibiotics.

Lyme Fact sheet

For more information visit: http://www.cdc.gov/lyme/  

http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/communicable/Tickborne/Lyme/Index.htm  
http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/communicable/TickBorne/index.htm  

For healthcare providers:  Tickborne Disease 2013
Prenatal Care Coordination is a Medicaid and BadgerCare Plus benefit that helps pregnant women get the support and services they need to have a healthy baby.

Prenatal Care Coordination services include:

• Help getting the health care you need.
• Personal support.
• Information on good eating habits and health practices.
• Information and help finding needed services in your community.

The care coordinator will help you by asking about your:
• Current and previous pregnancy.
• Health history.
• Relationships.
• Worries.

If you are eligible, the care coordinator will help you get the services you need. There is no copayment for this service. 920-294-4070.

Contact one of the following to find a care coordinator near you:

• Green Lake County Health Unit 920-294-4070
• Maternal and Child Health Hotline at 1-800-722-2295 (Voice/TTY)
Radon

Radon Gas

The Green Lake County Health and Human Services Department is part of a four County Radon Information Center (RIC). The information center was started in 1996 and also serves Dodge, Marquette, and Waushara Counties. Our RIC has compiled information and resources to educate residents about radon, associated health risks, testing procedures and methods of reduction.

What is Radon?

Radon is a colorless, odorless, tasteless and chemically inert gas. It is a byproduct of naturally occurring decay of uranium in rock, soil and water. It can be found in all 50 states. Radon can be easily inhaled and damage lung tissue due to the gas's radioactive properties.  Lung tissue damage can lead to cancer over time.

How does Radon get into my house?

Trapped gasses build up pressure in homes. As air leaves the attic of a home, a negative pressure field is formed, drawing soil gasses through floors and walls.

Very high Radon in water can add to levels in the home. Typically, Radon levels in water must be extremely high to make a significant contribution to the overall Radon gas level in a home. This is normally not seen in this area of Wisconsin.


What are the health effects associated with Radon?

The Surgeon General has warned that Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the US. Only smoking causes more cases of lung cancer. Smokers exposed to elevated Radon levels have a much higher risk of lung cancer.

Radon exposure does not cause any short-term health effects such as shortness of breath, headaches, respiratory illnesses, coughing or headaches.


My neighbor doesn't have high Radon. Do I need to test?

Yes. Radon levels can be different from home to home depending on a number of factors. This is commonly seen in our area. Typically, radon differs due to distance from the source but can also be affected by soil types and construction techniques.

How do I test for Radon?

You can test for radon with an EPA-listed kit or by hiring an EPA-listed contractor to test you home for you. KIts can be purchased on-line and at most local hardware stores.  The Green Lake County Department of Health & Human Services - Health Unit offers kits to county residents.  The kits distributed by the consortium are simple, easy to use, and come with full instructions. 

What level is considered "safe"?

The EPA states that any radon exposure may carry some risk, however; they recommend that homes be fixed if an occupant's long term exposure will average 4 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) or higher.

Can the problem be fixed and for how much?

Yes, the radon problem can be fixed with a mitigation system installed that meets the needs of each individual home. Costs differ based on the home but can run anywhere from $600 to $1200. Although we highly recommend that you use a licensed radon contractor, sometimes homeowners can install the systems themselves.

Radon resistant construction can be incorporated during building. Costs typically will be under $100 for the materials. Contact the information center for more information.

Resources for Additional Services:

What do I need to know about smallpox?

Smallpox is an extremely serious disease caused by a virus. It is passed from person to person by contact with body fluids and contaminated objects. It can also be (but rarely is) spread through the air in enclosed spaces, such as buildings.

Virus in droplets (from peoplesí breath) does not last long in the air. Ultraviolet light from the sun kills 90% of this virus in about 24 hours.

Most people who catch smallpox recover, but can suffer permanent scars on their skin. However, as many as 30% of people infected with smallpox can die.

No cases of smallpox have occurred in the world since 1980, when the disease was declared eradicated.

Why all this talk about smallpox now?

The US government believes that small amounts of smallpox virus that were used by our government and others to learn more about the virus and its spread may have made their way into the hands of those who could use it in a terrorist attack.

How likely is this threat to us? It is unclear at present if the possible use of smallpox virus for terrorism is likely.

So why donít we all just get vaccinated ?

Smallpox vaccine (which uses a related live virus, called vaccinia) has not been used since 1972, when smallpox was declared to be wiped out. The vaccine has a fairly high rate of complications, when compared with other vaccines.

Based on public health experience from years ago, we expect that for every million doses of smallpox vaccine given to people:

∑ 1 to 2 people will die

∑ 50 or more people will experience serious illness, sufficient for hospitalization

So, the plan is to first vaccinate those workers (public health and health care) who might be expected to come in contact with someone who is sick with smallpox. Also, military who might be sent in combat to an area where terrorist groups are active will be vaccinated. Next, those workers in emergency medical and related services will receive the vaccine. The plan for vaccinating individuals as a part of bioterrorism preparedness does not include the general public at this time.

If an unvaccinated person is exposed to smallpox, the disease can still be prevented if they receive the vaccine within 3 days. Vaccination within 4 to 7 days after exposure will offer some protection against the disease or lessen its symptoms.

Is there a treatment for smallpox?

There is no treatment for smallpox. However, antiviral drugs are being tested in animals.

For additional questions about smallpox, the symptoms of smallpox, and smallpox vaccine, please go to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) web site at: http://www.bt.cdc.gov/agent/smallpox/index.asp

Tobacco-Free Coalition

Updated 12/6/2013
Purpose
Green Lake Countypartners with concerned citizens, representatives of private and public organizations, students, educators, health professionals, and parents to achieve the following objectives:
*  Eliminate exposure to secondhand smoke by promoting smoke free 
   air 
policies.
*  Discourage youth from using tobacco 
*  Encourage adults to quit smoking

The coalition organized in January 2001 with a grant from the Wisconsin Tobacco Control Board. Since that time the coalition has participated in state and local efforts to lower tobacco use in Green Lake County.

 

Ongoing activities

Green Lake County receives funding from the Wisconsin Tobacco Control Board to conduct activities leading to smoke-free policies.  The primary objective is to eliminate secondhand smoke in all worksites, including restaurants and bars.  Working in conjunction with the Green Lake Area Health and Wellness Coalition, we encourage all county residents to join our efforts and welcome your involvement.  Please call 294-4070 and ask for the county health educator or public health officer if you are interested in working with the coalition or if you want assistance in promoting smoke-free policies.

Green Lake County also works with Wisconsin Wins, a program designed to monitor and reduce the statewide rate of illegal tobacco sales to minors. Under this program, youth, accompanied by Health Department staff, check tobacco retailers twice a year for compliance with state laws regarding tobacco sales. The other focus of the program is youth activism, with students from the county schools promoting tobacco-free activities in their communities.

Services available

Persons interested in quitting smoking should call the Wisconsin Quit Line at 1-877-QUIT-NOW (784-8669). The Quit Line offers free information on quitting smoking, one-on-one practical telephone counseling on how to boost chances for success in quitting, and referrals to local quit smoking programs and services. Pregnant women smokers who qualify for the WIC program and who are interested in quitting smoking can get help through the First Breath program.

Educational materials, displays, videos, handouts and program on secondhand smoke are available from the county for use by community organizations. To find more about materials and services, call 920-294-4070 and ask for the health educator or county health officer.

Tobacco Related Websites:

*       www.fightwithfact.com

*         (a website for youth activism)

*       www.tobwis.org

*         (Tobacco Control Resource Center for Wisconsin)

*       www.smokefreewi.org

*          (SmokeFree Wisconsin, policy experts)

*       www.ctri.wisc.edu

*          (Wisconsin experts on treating tobacco dependence)  

*       www.dhfs.state.wi.us/tobacco

*          (Links to WI tobacco control program)

*       www.cdc.gov/tobacco

*          (Data, statistics & publications)

*       www.no-smoke.org

*          (Americans for Non-Smokers Rights)

*       www.tobaccofreekids.org

*          (Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids)

*         

 

Employers looking for resources to help them become smoke-free will find assistance at:


www.tobwis.org/employers/index.php 
 

Retailers who want to direct their employees to a state program regarding the sale of tobacco products should go to www.smokecheck.org for training and testing materials

 

 For more information see attached links:

Tobacco Free Living Quarterly Newsleter February 2013
August 2013 Quarterly Newsletter 5 Counties for Tobacco-Free Living

The Green Lake County Health Unit has water test kits to test your water for:

  • bacteria
  • fluoride
  • nitrates

The test kits are sent to the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene for analysis. There is a fee for each test and results take approximately one week.

Private wells should be tested annually to ensure good water quality.

For more in formation contact the Green Lake County Health Unit at (920)294-4070.

See website for more information http://www.glcwc.org/site/

West Nile Virus

West Nile Virus (WNV) was first identified in Green Lake County in 2002, in a dead blue jay. As of January 1, 2003, 6 birds and 1 horse found in Green Lake County in 2002 have tested positive, and the virus has been found in birds in several other Wisconsin counties so far this year. For this reason, the emergence of the mosquito-borne West Nile Virus (WNV) in Wisconsin has created the need for a public health response. The following is information about WNV, the illness that may result, and Madisonís public health response.
Click here for state-wide and national public health information on West Nile Virus.

What is WNV?

WNV is a virus that was first identified in Uganda in 1937. This virus was first identified in the United States in 1999 during an outbreak in New York. Since that time, the virus has been found in mosquitoes, birds, horses, and humans in various locations in the United States.

How can I be exposed to WNV?

People may be exposed to West Nile Virus when an infected mosquito bites them. However, only a small percentage of mosquitoes are expected to carry the virus so the risk of being infected with WNV from any single mosquito bite is very small. For a mosquito to become infected with the virus, it must bite an infected bird, usually a crow or blue jay.

Do all mosquitoes carry WNV?

No. Monitoring data in the United States has indicated that mosquitoes in the Culex group are most often infected with WNV. This is significant because most of the nuisance mosquitoes in Green Lake County belong to the Aedes group, which are less likely to carry the West Nile Virus. Culex mosquitoes found in the Green Lake County area (usually Culex pipens) are considered to be evening and nighttime biters and commonly breed in stagnant or polluted water.

Can WNV make me sick?

Most of the time, people infected with WNV will have no symptoms or will develop a mild illness that includes fever. In severe cases, encephalitis may develop. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that less than 1% of persons that get infected will develop severe illness. Serious illness resulting from WNV is more likely in persons greater than 50 years of age.

What can I do to prevent exposure to WNV?

Reduce Mosquito breeding sites. The Culex mosquitoes found in Green Lake County prefer to breed in stagnant or polluted water. For this reason, eliminating standing water from your property may have a significant impact on reducing the number of Culex and other mosquitoes. Eliminate standing water around your home and neighborhood by:

  • Disposing of used tires.
  • Cleaning rain gutters.
  • Change water in bird-baths and child wading pools every 2-3 days.
  • Keep swimming pools chlorinated.
  • Keep any containers from collecting rainwater (i.e. wheel barrows, flower pots, buckets, swimming pool covers, etc)

Reduce the number of bites you receive. While mosquito bites cannot be eliminated completely, they can be reduced by simple behavior changes when out amongst the mosquitoes. Some of these include:

  • Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants when outdoors.
  • Spray clothing with repellents containing permethrin or DEET since mosquitoes may bite through thin clothing.
  • Apply insect repellent sparingly to exposed skin. An effective repellent will contain 35% DEET (N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide). DEET in high concentrations (greater than 35%) provides no additional protection. Some products using natural repellants may be effective for shorter periods of time.
  • Repellants for children should contain no more than 10% DEET.
  • Repellents may irritate the eyes and mouth, so avoid applying repellent to the hands of children.
  • Whenever you use an insecticide or insect repellent, be sure to read and follow the manufacturer's DIRECTIONS FOR USE, as printed on the product.
  • Note: Vitamin B and "ultrasonic" devices are NOT effective in preventing mosquito bites.
  • When the wind is calm or low, sit in front of a fan to reduce the ability of mosquitoes to fly and land on you to bite.
  • Install or repair window and door screens.

Green Lake County's Public Health response.

Green Lake County Public Health is focusing on education and surveillance activities to address the concern about WNV in our area. Green Lake County residents who find a sick or dead crow or blue jay should call (920)294-4070 to report the bird. Green Lake County staff will no longer be picking up dead blue jays and crows and transporting them to the WI Veterinary Diagnostic Lab for analysis. We had been collecting crows and blue jays for WNV testing in order to monitor for the presence of WNV in Green Lake County. A sufficient number of birds in the County have tested positive to indicate that WNV is present here. We are still collecting reports of dead/sick crows and blue jays to track numbers of dead/sick birds and to monitor for areas with a high number of dead/sick birds. After reporting a dead bird, the bird can be picked up and disposed of in the household garbage by placing a plastic bag over your hand, picking up the bird with the covered hand, and pulling the bag around the bird. While West Nile Virus has not been shown to be transmitted to humans by touching an infected bird, it is prudent to avoid touching sick or dead birds with bare hands. Double bagging and sealing or tightly tying the bag shut should help prevent odors in the garbage.

If you have further questions about West Nile Virus in Green Lake County, call (920)294-4070.

Wisconsin Well Woman Program
Need help getting women's health checkups? The Wisconsin Well Woman Program pays for clinical breast exam, pap & pelvic exam and mammogram.
You may be eligible for services AT NO COST TO YOU if
▪You are a woman age 45-64
▪You have little or no health insurance
▪Your annual household income meets our guidelines--up to $27,075 for one person, $36,425 for two people*
*Net taxable income for farm families and self-employed persons. For larger families add $9,350 for each additional person.

For residents of Green Lake, Marquette, and Waushara Counties, call Jackie Westover at 1-800-664-3588 or (920)294-4070.
jwestover@co.green-lake.wi.us

WIC CLINICS: Please call 1-800-942-5330 or 1-920-787-4737 to schedule a WIC appointment

1st Wednesday Berlin Armory 8:30 am - 4:00 pm
2nd Tuesday   
2nd Wednesday
Berlin Armory 8:30 am - 4:00 pm
Health & Human Services 8:30 am - 4:00 pm
3rd Tuesday Health & Human Services 8:30 am - 4:00 pm

**Clinic dates are adjusted if they fall on legal or government holidays.

For more information regarding WIC (Women, Infants and Children) please go to the following website: http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/wic/